Jersey Coastal Walk

THE JERSEY COASTAL WALK

The Jersey Coastal walk is 50 miles (having vowed to forget walks such as last years which was 130 miles.)  As one ages, I’d say 50 miles is probably quite enough

Last time I was anticipating a wonderful even surface all the way across The South Downs. This was far, far from the reality. So, based on that, I’m expecting vile weather and am going to be blown off a cliff. Hopefully this will ensure the opposite!

In addition, there are parts incorporating beaches which can be crossed on foot, according to the tides, and I will be swept aside by foaming waves.

There is the Collas Crill Island Walk every summer taking this route, raising money for charity, where over 1000 people start but less than half finish - so it’s obviously not that easy!

I'd be so grateful if you would make a donation for this walk. All the proceeds go to Cats Protection, where healthy and happy felines are our passion! Thank you!

-Donating through JustGiving is simple, fast and totally secure. Your details are safe with JustGiving - they'll never sell them on or send unwanted emails. Once you donate, they'll send your money directly to the charity. So it's the most efficient way to donate - saving time and cutting costs for the charity.
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/suebournemeow

You can donate after the event is finished too :)

Sue Bourne, Secretary x

UPDATE ON PROGRESS: WALK COMPLETE

Well, we managed the Jersey Coast Path! On the plus side, the weather the whole time in Jersey was stunning. We took thin waterproof jackets and never had need of them the whole time. On the minus side, it was blindingly hot on the longest day. 

It was only 11 and a half miles, which is dead easy on the flat. Unfortunately, it was not on the flat; there were loads and loads of steps. Where the people responsible for installing the steps had decided they weren’t necessary, the path still went up and down steeply - all in bright sunlight on the hottest day of the walk! We had to meet our lift at a specific time so needed to push on without dropping the pace. Even though I was dropping myself ☹

We made it, and sank gratefully into the car seat. The taxi driver had transported us before so we knew he was a Jerseyman, born and bred. He spent most of the year in the Philippines now and only few weeks driving to get his fare back . Seems he’d forgotten the roads in Jersey, since he missed the turning to the top of our one-way street. Wearily, I told him the drop is at the bottom. The road is a hill, which just about crowned the day. 

That evening, I went to sleep at 8.00pm; the first time since age 6, and slept like the dead until being awakened by a noise to find my friend by the curtains at the window. Being rudely snatched from a coma I gabbled, “What time is it?” Ruth responded, “Quarter past nine.” We were due out of the guest house at 9.30am and I was horrified to hear this and expressed my feelings in no uncertain terms. Ruth looked at me strangely. “Quarter past nine in the evening,” she said in a tone reserved for people lacking any intelligence whatsoever.

We did come across many birds new to us, but none so weird as the raven which sounded like a pig. I checked out the noises they are known to produce (online); some strange ones but no oinks. And, no, watched his beak moving in synchronisation with the sound and there were no pigs around either.


Thank you, everyone, for all your wonderful support

Sue Bourne